Atelier

The “Dutch” Cheese

I bought in the days before the Salon del Gusto. So I took photos of it and took it around to the Piemontese cheesemakers there, asking what it was. They laughed and said it looked "Dutch", meaning someone had faked me.
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In the hard-to-find “Farmers” Area of Torino’s massive Porta Palazzo market, most of the cheese was smelly and looked like a rock. I saw and bought one thing that appealed to me. There was no sign and no talking in English. The cheese turned out to be spectacular.

I went back, but the seller wasn’t there.

I bought in the days before the Salon del Gusto. So I took photos of it and took it around to the Piemontese cheesemakers there, asking what it was. They laughed and said it looked “Dutch”, meaning someone had faked me. But I know Dutch cheese, and it wasn’t.

Six months later, I was back in Torino and went to the Porta Palazzo to find the farmer, in vain.

But then I was in Bologna at a market and I saw a cheese that looked right – and then tasted right.

The mystery “Dutch” cheese was indeed not Piemontese, but not too far away. It’s Venetian Ubriacone.

 

The “Dutch” is on the left in my portrait, next to a Piemontese Grana.

 

 

I don’t know if you’ll find the Ubriacone, but you will find treasures IF you can find this part of the Porta Palazzo. Even locals don’t know about it, so here’s a map: